Problems Learning Russian?

Dear Friends,

I have been receiving requests about the less difficult ways to learn a few basic Russian words and phrases from those who only need Russian for their short trips to the Russian speaking countries once in a while. If you are one of such people, you are very welcome to share your learning goals with me, and I will help you find the best resources for fast and effective learning.

You are welcome to check the Romantic Russian Phrase Book — a simple huide to the most needed Russian words and phrases for those who are about to take short trips to Russia and meet local people there. One cannot learn to speak Russian fluently in a few days or weeks, but it is possible to protect yourself by having a great ‘assistant’ at all times right at hand during your trip: a book of phrases (with translations) to use in daily situations during your visit to Russia.

If the book still looks too long for you, please contact me personally , and we will select even a simpler way for you to reach the goal of being able to communicate with Russians during your trip.

I wish you to have a wonderful and successful trip to the Russian speaking world!

The Truth Behind the Christmas Tree

xmas-treeThis is a picture of the famous Harold Lloyd’s Christmas Tree of 1974. According to some Internet resources, it took the Lloyds family a whole month to decorate it. Well, I have no idea how much this giant could weigh, but–

Cats of the world, keep away! 🙂

The tree was made by wiring three large Douglas firs together. The carcass was then fireproofed and reinforced with bamboo and steel bolts. The resulting giant was 20 feet high, 9 feet wide, and 30 feet in diameter. Thousands of Ornaments were used to decorate it. They say, Harrold Lloyd loved collecting Christmas ornaments, he would buy some  new items all the year round, wherever he used to travel. xmas-tree-HL

The tree is supposed to look beautiful, and– well, in human understanding it does, because it is perfectly proportional, amazingly luxurious, enormous in size, and it was ‘assembled’ of so many shining items, each one really beautiful in itself, that it wows everyone who takes a look at it.

But to me, it also looks bizarre, even a bit scary, especially now, when I know that it conceals three bodies of some day gorgeous and healthy trees and a mass of bamboo sticks and bolts.

It looks kind of scary because it reminds me of our world today: seemingly beautiful, shining and full of life, but being held together by quite a big mass of ugly stuff, and we, people people of the world, are nothing more than billions of shining, but freakishly vulnerable decorations, helplessly hanging down from it. Each of us knows this, but we prefer not to think about it: we keep hanging and shining, and pretending that there is nothing wrong with our big Mother tree.

I did not intend to make you sad by this post: I was just telling what I consider to be the truth. But if it did make you sad, it means that you also feel the way I do… at least a little bit. Do you?

Discussing Main Publishing Trends of 2018

booksIt is always good to be aware of the dynamics of the industry you represent, so I try not to miss the annual emails on main publishing trends that come with my subscriptions to various online resources for authors. In 2018, the major authors’ resource authorspublish.com has been discussing the following tendencies in the publishing industry:

1. The euphoria of self-publishing is wearing off ;

2. Independent publishers are becoming more likely to be closed to unsolicited submissions;

3. There are fewer eBook-only publishers (According to authorspublish.com, “A number of eBook-only publishers have closed this year. Others that have focused on eBooks only are now publishing print versions as well.”);

4. More literary journals are charging reading fees;

5. More prestigious literary journals are charging reading fees;

6. More literary journals are having free submission options;

7. Presses have no time to send rejections;

8. Print journals are becoming rarer and rarer;

9. Publishers are consolidating;

10. More small manuscript presses are using Submittable. 

These trends were kind of anticipated by experts, but now we have an ‘official’ confirmation that the changes are rue, which allows every author to make better conclusions about their personal writing and publishing strategies for 2019.

These facts, however, cannot provide a full and objective picture of the industry dynamics without another piece of information–on  international bestsellers lists for fiction books, published in a few European countries (France, Germany, Italy, and Spain) in English. After studying the lists provided in Nina Sabak’s article at publishingtrends.com and a few other similar resources, outlining current publishing trends in Russia, Poland and Germany, I came up with some interesting conclusions:

  1. There is an internationally developing tendency to print and sell mainly the books of certain genres: mainly mysteries, thrillers, then some fantasy books and a bit of speculative prose, while other popular genres (like romance) are not printed in large quantities in Europe;
  2. It is possible that the major publishers are taking steps toward printing mainly the bestsellers that can be regarded as ‘universally’ accepted pieces of reading and will more certainly be purchased as gifts (to be placed on a bookshelf and read again and again) rather than as pocket editions. This fact confirms that, due to the  quickly developing attitude to printed books as souvenirs rather than information (knowledge) carriers, the publishers all over the world tend to print a limited variety of the most popular bestsellers (innthe most popular genres), while the rest of the books tend to be distributed as e-books.

I also believe that in the nearest years, a new tendency to write shorter fiction books will continue to develop. This conclusion does not follow from the above mentioned articles, but the general tendencies listed here indirectly confirm such possibility.

Any way, the changes are coming tha they are inevitable. Let us see what changes the coming year is going to bring to the publishing industry. And now, just look at the beautiful picture below — very probably, for the last time, because as of now, more and more people prefer to have a kindle device or a phone in their hands while reading.

learning1

Reading Elevation by Stephen King

elevation

As soon as I finished reading Elevation, my very first thoughts about the book were these:
– The author must have reached a new level of personal maturity: his story teaches the reader.  A story like Elevation could never be written by a young, inexperienced lad. The author does not aim to boost anybody’s emotions, he rather intends to open the reader’s eyes at the most important things in life: understanding, support, friendship, kindness;
– Amazingly, after nearly five decades of writing thrillers and suspense, Stephen King has come up with a piece of full hearted, touching prose; and
– I love the fact that Elevation is not as long as some of King’s novels. Its length perfectly harmonizes with the plot and the pace of the story.

Elevation is a masterly written, brillitly plotted, very imaginative and paradoxical story, which literally glows with wisdom and kindness of its author. While reading the first chapters, I could not help anticipating a sudden twist of the plot or a shocking event that would change the dynamics of the narration, because… well, I was reading a Stephen King’s book, but nothing of the kind happened, and somewhere half way through the book I began to enjoy the unusually tender, touching and inspiring flow of the story.

It is set in a town of Castle Rock, where the locals live a dull, slow-paced, provincial life, full of prejudices and biases. The main character, Scott, who struggles with a mysterious illness that causes him to lose weight, becomes involved into a silly, escalating battle with the lesbians living next door. Little by little, Scott begins to understand the prejudices faced by his neighbors, and decides to make an attempt and help them.

Unlikely for Stephen King’s books, Elevation reads like a light, pacifying, heartwarming tale; it demonstrates how different experiences can influence our ways of thinking; it tells how resentment can be healed and proves that the most steadfast prejudices can be overcome. In his Washington Post review of the book, Ron Charles wrote: “[King] has written a slim book about an ordinary man in an extraordinary condition rising above hatred and learning to live with tact and dignity. That’s not much of a Halloween book, but it’s well timed for our terrifying season.”

I would strongly recommend this book to everyone: it is uplifing; it is elevating; it inspires hope, and hope is exactly what many of us need to overcome the laziness of mind and apathy in the middle of this “terrifying season”.

Back to Blogging

Female student writing at deskI never thought that returning to blogging after a break of a few months would be so difficult. In fact, these days, I am returning not only to blogging, but to writing fiction, as well. The break was necessary, for I had to focus on writing a massive non-fiction book on preparing for the first job interview, which is intended for students and college/university graduates. Now, that work is almost finished, the book will be published in one of the leading  Ukrainian publishing houses in 2019.

2018-09-27_sore-throatSo, my mind is free from that work, but I recently found out that it is kind of free from other thoughts, too! I am hollow and empty like a Christmas tree ball ornament!

It must be tiredness, I guess. Some call this a writer’s block, others call this laziness of mind, or procrastination.

Whatever it is, I need a boost. I hope that reading a really good fiction book can revive my emotional life, and then, I will be able to return to writing fiction again. Please, give me some advice on how to overcome it, if you have your ‘remedies’ against the thing called writer’s block.

Thank you!

 

Shelf Love

live mines and duds: the reading life

May The Best Book Win!

librocubicularist | nonfiction | moonlights as the host of Silent Book Club Kota Kinabalu | writes on Scrivener