Another Book Has Been Born

English for Your Job Interview

English for Your Job Interview is a preparation guide for a job interview in English. Its 51 units cover the most frequently asked interview questions and offer multiple training exercises and useful tips to help the job candidates communicate effectively with hiring managers during the interview.

The book is perfect for everyone whose English level is Intermediate or higher. It is indispensable for non-native speakers of English, who are seeking employment in international companies at the start of their careers.

Most importantly, English for Your Job Interview offers a way how to develop the skill of acting and communicating confidently during the interview. This book has already helped dozens of young professionals find their dream jobs.

That Smile That Can Win a Job Interview …

The video chat was not long: I needed an interpreter urgently, because the client was already waiting for my email proposal with a whole package of services. A good client, by the way, it would’ve been stupid to loose him. So, I didn’t have much time and I had to choose an interpreter to work with.

The girl seemed smart, reliable, serious and motivated, which was good. But she was so young! Her voice was child-like and she looked like a high school student. We were still talking, but I kind of knew that I was not going to hire her.

I was wrapping up the interview and saying something conventional like “It was a pleasure meeting you”, when all of a sudden she moved a bit forward toward her screen so I could see her face in close-up. She raised her hand in greeting and answered something like “I am sorry I cannot shake your hand”. Her eyes were looking directly into mine and she was smiling genuinely, showing me rows of beautiful white teeth, and I suddenly realized: that was the smile of success!

She had it in her nature, without training or spending years in international work. She was a diplomat by personality type, and so every experience was going to only develop what she’d already had from birth. That was exactly the smile I always expect to see on faces of experts in international business.

I hired her and gave her the job. In the following years, she became a wonderful assistant, and a friend, a good friend. I never regretted that I’d hired her.

So, how does it work? What kind of smile can win a job interview? During years of my career, I learned a few ‘smile-building rules’ that cannot be just  imitated: they become the background for forming the facial expression of success. Here they are:

  1. A good smile is the one that is
    relaxed. A tensed smile only shows your nervousness, but a natural
    one displays your strong ability to control yourself even in
    situations of nervousness.

  2. A smile of success shows
    confidence and independence of a person’s mind: it is not blunt or
    arrogant; it is simply a smile of a person who is completely
    self-sufficient and knows what he/she is doing.

  3. A smile of success is not about
    making jokes or showing your humorous nature; no, it is different.
    It tells everyone without words that you are intelligent and smart.
    This is a smile of politeness and respect for those who you are
    talking to.

  4. A good smile should come on a
    good moment. You should not smile all the time — just keep it like
    a trump card and pull it out when the moment is right.

  5. A good smile reflects your positive nature: it tells to
    others that you aren’t bringing problems, but quite on the opposite:
    you may become their mascot, if you know how to use it.

Well, now, try to imagine that you possess all of the qualities I listed above. Think of a skill that you are really proud of (it may be anything, from cooking delicious foods to making great tea or dancing polka, or  programming). Think about your best skill and tell about it to a looking glass. At some moment you’ll see yourself smiling. This will be the smile. Remember it.

Train it and keep it with you when you come to a meeting that’s very important to you. If this is a job interview, that smile can well get you hired.

How To Read Faces in a Job Interview

The boy was wearing a snow-while shirt and an elegant grey suit, definitely from a very expensive store or fashion atelier. When he entered the classroom, I noticed that his shining black shoes were a bit too narrow to be comfortable (right in agreement with the latest fashion), so I could not help thinking that he possibly did what we — women — use to do: brought the shoes in a plastic bag and put them on right before the exam. No, those shoes weren’t made for walking, they were designed to impress, and a guy wearing such shoes should not be sitting in front of an examination commission: he would look more in the right place half lying behind a huge oak desk, with his legs on the table, showing the soles of those shoes to his visitors.

I think I grinned to the thought, because the boy glanced at me with blatant complacency, frowned, and immediately looked away. At that very moment an urgent phone call made me excuse myself and leave the room for a couple of minutes.

When I returned, the boy was still sitting across the table from my colleagues, but my first thought was that it was possibly a different student. The snow-white shirt, heavy of sweat, got stuck to his chest in a few places; the nifty grey jacket slid to the side: my foppish boy was desperately looking for words trying to say something in English. His eyes were traveling about the opposite wall, while his arms , strong and fleshy, were hanging on the sides as if they were made of rope; He made a grammar mistake, then another, and one more, and finally, having noticed that teachers began to exchange glances, he fell silent a all.

Read more about it here

As a university teacher with decades of experience behind my shoulders, I have seen similar scenes many times. They are, by the way, very close to what hiring managers see during job interviews. The one being tested can either earn himself a good grade by displaying the right behavior or plunge into the abyss of self-deprecation and spoil the impression about himself once and for all. Below in this article, I have listed a few notes about the right behavior in responsible moments of life: during tests, exams or job interviews. Try to remember them when you face an important moment in life.

YOUR HEAD

If you are sitting in front of an interviewer (and in majority of situations you are), the most prominent part of your body that is openly displayed to the interviewer is your head. Try using it in your favor, not against yourself.

  • When your head is slightly tilted, this displays your interest and empathy;
  • Direct eye contact shows confidence, trust and interest; do not forget to look right into the eyes of your interviewer and do your best to do this without tension;
  • Smile. Put yourself in a positive frame of mind before the interview and try to keep this mood till the very end of the event;
  • Try to control the movements of your eyebrows. Too many changes on your face may cause unnecessary thoughts in the interviewer’s mind.

YOUR ARMS AND HANDS

First of all, control their movements all the time. Too much of gesticulation will tire your interviewer. Just move as much as you need to look natural. Your shoulders and arms should be wide open; this usually means that the person is relaxed and open to discussing ideas. Crossed arms are usually an obvious indication of being unengaged and uncomfortable.

YOUR POSTURE

Posture is one of the most reliable indicators of how someone feels. Always pay special attention to the way you sit, stand or walk, because your posture is a piece of your body language puzzle. For example,

  • a straight and open torso indicates that you are at ease and confident;
  • conversely, hunched shoulders and back can indicate a defensive, or weary state of mind;
  • leaning towards the interviewer will make you appear interested in the content of the interview;
  • at the same time, mirroring the interviewer’s body posture indicates an alignment of views, as well as comfort and connection. Do not forget to do this, if you feel it might work in your favor.

YOUR LEGS AND FEET

Quite often, they are difficult to see, but, surprisingly, they are a good indicator of how someone is feeling towards you. So keep yours under control and if possible, throw a glance at the inreviewer’s.

  • when both of their feet are pointing towards you, this indicates interest and an openness to connection;
  • a foot pointed out or away means a desire to wrap up the talk and leave;
  • crossed legs usually give out a defensive or closed off person;
  • shifting weight from side to side or a leg twitching shows that the person is anxious or stressed;
  • sitting comfortably, with a straight back and both feet pointed towards the interviewer would be the best solution for you. Even in a phone/ video interview when your lower half can’t be seen, if you act as you would in an in-person interview, you will come across as enthusiastic.

Finally, it is good to remember that we are all people. We have our lives and quite often, the most important career-breaking day for you is just another boring day of work for your interviewer. Do not try to guess what they are thinking during the interview (it may be something not related to the interview at all); just try to look confident and friendly and learn to control all parts of your body to make them work in your favor.

Good luck!

Shelf Love

live mines and duds: the reading life

May The Best Book Win!

librocubicularist | nonfiction | moonlights as the host of Silent Book Club Kota Kinabalu | writes on Scrivener