The Romantic English Phrase Book

Романтический разговорник английского языка

Phrasebook-B5

ИЗУЧАЙТЕ АНГЛИЙСКИЙ С ЛЮБОВЬЮ!

The Romantic ENGLISH Phrase Book is a great assistant for Russian women who are taking their first steps in learning English

Романтический разговорник английского языка – это набор простых, легко запоминающихся английских фраз на все случаи жизни

  • Уникальный набор фраз, необходимых для общения с собеседником-иностранцем
  • множество диалогов, имитирующих ситуации романтического общения
  • полезная информация от экспертов в области лингвистики и психологии отношений
  • примеры житейских ситуаций в диалогах и заметки о Западной культуре
  • постоянная связь с автором на http://www.rinatim.com
  • возможность получения консультаций 24/7

Эта книга дублирует Романтический разговорник русского языка, который мы составили ранее для иностранцев, приезжающих к своим русскоговорящим невестам. Чтобы понимать друг друга, вам и вашему иностранному гостю достаточно держать разговорники наготове и обмениваться фразами из тех тематических блоков, которые подходят к конкретной ситуации общения.

Обе книги имеют одинаковое содержание и состоят из 18 разделов:

Тема 1. Как вежливо привлечь к себе внимание?
               Unit 1. How to Be Polite in English?
Тема 2. Приветствия.
               Unit 2. Greetings.
Тема 3. Ваша первая встреча.
               Unit 3. Your First Meeting with Him.
Тема 4. Скажите ему что-нибудь приятное.
               Unit 4. Tell Him Something Nice.
Тема 5. Принимаем и дарим подарки.
               Unit 5. Accepting and Making Gifts.
Тема 6. Романтический ужин на двоих.
               Unit 6. Romantic Dinner for Two.
Тема 7. Если разговор угас.
               Unit 7. When the Talk Is Slow.
Тема 8. Когда вы остались один на один.
               Unit 8. Moments of Intimacy.
Тема 9. Всё делаем вместе.
               Unit 9. Doing Things Together.
Тема 10. Развлекаемся и отдыхаем.
               Unit 10. Having Fun Together.
Тема 11. Как попросить о чем-либо.
               Unit 11. Asking for Things.
Тема 12. Разговор по телефону.
               Unit 12. Speaking on the Phone.
Тема 13. Поездка в такси.
               Unit 13. In a Taxi.
Тема 14. Ходим по магазинам.
               Unit 14. Shopping Together.
Тема 15. Когда он у вас в гостях.
               Unit 15. Inviting Him to Meet Your Family.
Тема 16. Некоторые стартеры для беседы.
               Unit 16. Conversation Starters.
Тема 17. Несколько фраз для личной переписки.
                Unit 17. Phrases to Use in Love Letters.
Тема 18. Часто употребляемые слова.
                Unit 18. Words to Use in Conversation.

Желаем вам удачи в вашем романтическом путешествии в английскую культуру!

The Visual Component of Reading

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Studying the changes in the books industry has never been more captivating than now. With the soaring amount of published production and the mindblowing number of genres and styles offered by millions of authors, the readers’ tastes and preferences are also changing. This process is developing deep in our minds, behind the veil of impetuous real life changes, so we seldom give it the deserved attention. Still, the fact is obvious: our reading habits are changing.

First of all, our ‘skill’ of reading today is certainly different from that of our parents and grandparents. Take the latest 30 years: with all informational technologies which have come to our lives, we all read a lot every day. Even those who never pick up a book, cannot completely ignore reading: they simply have to read every sign, ad, or warning that dashes into their eyes; because of the changing lifestyle, every person must be a fast reader today.

Being able to read very fast has become an inevitable, life-protecting skill.

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Secondly, it is the quality of perception of the information which comes to our minds through reading. It is changing rapidly, too. Some people describe their own reading process like “reading with inner eye” that “copies the words from the book and makes them understandable” for them; some say that they “read by pronouncing words in their mind” and “listen to the sound of words, then understand them”; while others say that they “visualize what they read”, so the images — not the written words — give them the feeling of what they have read. It is interesting to watch how the number of people in the second group is growing, and in the third group is soaring, while the number of “verbal” readers is decreasing.

Isn’t it a red light for authors to revise their writing and make it as ‘visual’ as it can be?

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We have a habit of offering a lot of illustrated books for children. The grown-ups, however, believe that they are mature enough not to have to attract themselves to reading by looking at illustrations. In my opinion, this approach needs to be revised. It is not the question of maturity; today, it is the question of our survival. Our minds have to process incredible amounts of information every minute, and I am sure that our minds, without letting us know (so far), are already trying to adapt to this change.

Our minds process tons of informational packages which flow into it through our eyes, ears, noses and all other perceptive organs. The visual information comes in a ‘condensed’ way and is easier and faster to process. This is why our brain “likes it more” when it is visual, don’t you think?

I think this provides another red light for authors to revise their textual production and make it more “visual”. Because, unless we think about it, our readers will: they will simply stop reading anything that is not “visual” or “imaginative”.

Finally, here is a scheme I ran across in an article describing the essential components of reading . The article focuses on a different study, but what I found interesting here is the authors’ focus on studying the dynamics of their students’ spelling ability. Here is what it says:
reading-components+spelling“A group of researchers found that, although students’ growth in passage comprehension remained close to average from first through fourth grade, their spelling scores dropped dramatically by third grade and continued to decline in fourth grade (Mehta et al., 2005).  Progress in reading does not necessarily result in progress in spelling.  Spelling instruction is needed to develop students’ spelling skills.”

In this particular case, the researchers’ task was to solve the problem of the kids’ inattention to spelling as they read and write. In my opinion, this whole situation could be anticipated (and is going to develop even more in the future): the younger generation no longer “reads with their eyes”; I mean, they no longer tend to “photocopy” the written words and paste them into their memory: they prefer to use a more convenient and direct way of acquiring knowledge: their imagination. The ability to visualize everything you read right away, as soon as you see it written, and to create a dynamic mind picture (practically creating video in our minds) is quickly replacing all other methods of information preception.

Visualizing text is convenient; moreofer, it is becoming a necessary part of our lives, unless you want to fall behind the others at scool and gain a reputation of a “slow guy”.

Don’t you think that behind this process lies an answer to the question: “Which genres and styles of writing are going to become more popular in the nearest future?” To me, this is an important question which is going to show me the direction to go in my future work.

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Verbal Art Made Visible

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I’d like to begin this one with a quote:

“Conflict generates energy and that energy, at its best, reveals a universal truth. In almost every iconic masterpiece you will see this equation at work. Writers would be well served to seek out some of these iconic visual works and examine them closely.” Annie Weatherwax

These words belong to an artist, who found her way to writing fiction by studying masterpieces of visual art- a necessary component of education for every creative person, which so many representatives of the verbal arts world ignore today.

Conflict is a critical condition for plot development in fiction writing. Tension, its inevitable product, helps keep the story dynamics and thus, ensures its ripeness and thoroughness. As Annie Waterwax notes,

“Tension is a primary component in all forms of art, achieved by the conflict between opposing elements. It’s the tension that holds our interest. In a masterpiece, the energy created by that tension reveals a universal truth. And a masterful artist does this without the viewer knowing it. She slips the message into our collective subconscious unnoticed.”

This peculiar talent of knowing how to send ‘the message into our collective subconscious’ is often overlooked by writers as something irrelevant, and the reason why they cannot do it is lack of general aesthetic education. Sadly, fiction writing is rarely mentioned as an art form today (in my opinion, it still is); the widely accepted ‘standards’ of fiction writing focus mainly on genre, plot and structure requirements, while the artistic beauty of writing is just a nice additional bonus, welcomed mainly by publishers, because majority of readers are rather attracted by fast-pace plot development and intrigue than by the way it works to enrich our aesthetic personality. Overwhelming majority of people today prefer visual arts and music to reading, while appreciation for the beauty of writing style and its harmony with genre and structure of the story is regarded as an extravagant whim of the few.

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Still, knowing a lot about art in general helps every writer, because it broadens their imagination and develops their artistic taste. I am glad to see that the most appreciated fiction writers today (irrespectively of the genre they write in) are always people of good aesthetic taste (quite often, they are passionate art lovers). 

Putting it simply, developing a good aesthetic taste is a way to see more beauty around you, and- yes, one needs to learn to see beauty! And beauty is exactly that energy, mentioned above, which reveals universal truths to a person. Without learning about it, an author lacks necessary means of high-quality writing.

Our imagination is born deep inside our mind, in the storage of memory, knowledge and life experiences which we have accumulated during our lives. If we have a good deal of beautiful images, associations and emotional memories stored there, the final products of our imagination have more potential to be beautiful, too. Only an author who has a good taste for visual (musical and other) arts can create really beautiful verbal pictures and deliver them to other people’s minds. I think we should always remember this when we sit down to create our masterpieces in writing.

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I, a Passer, Close to Everyone, Alien to All 

I, a Passer, Close to Everyone, Alien to All. (“Я – прохожий, близкий всем, всему чужой.”) M.Voloshin

These beautiful lines belong to Maximilian Voloshin,  a Russian poet of Ukrainian-German origin, commonly known as Max Voloshin (1877 – 1932). I just finished re-reading Voloshin’s Faces of Creation (“Лики творчества”), a profound and masterful study of evolution of some art movements, a book which I had admired as a student, and now re-discovered again, nearly 30 years later.

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“Art is intimate. Art is the artist’s appeal to another
man. The secret of artistic pleasure is always committed
only between two people.” M.Voloshin

Voloshin_01 Max Voloshin was one of the significant representatives of the Symbolist movement in Russian culture and literature. He became famous as a poet and a critic of literature and the arts.

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His poetry is as symbolistic as his paintings, yet it is so besutiful that I keep rolling his words over in my mind again and again. Here are a few lines I particularly like; I tried to interpret them into English for you:

Так странно, свободно и просто      So oddly, so freely, so just

Мне выявлен смысл бытия,              I can grasp secret meanings of things:

И скрытое в семени “я”,                      The semen, revealing my kinks,

И тайна цветенья и роста.                The magic of rising and rust.

В растенье и в камне – везде,           In every creation or being

В горах, в облаках, над горами       In the clouds, beyond, and above

И в звере, и в синей звезде,             I can hear the song of agreeing

Я слышу поющее пламя.                  with the rapturous fire of life.

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Voloshin was known for his brilliant translations of a number of French poetic and prose works into Russian, but amazingly, the Wikipedia article about him hardly even mentions the fact that Voloshin – a critic, a poet, and a philosopher – was also a great artist himself. As a tribute to his artistic talent, here are a few images of his works.

Voloshin_02 “The unconscious is, perhaps, the only reality,” Voloshin used to say. (“Бессознательное – это, может, единственная реальность.”) He believed that when a person’s conscious skills grow, the subconscious “burning” inside her dies out. (Сознательное мастерство растет, подсознательное горение идет на убыль. ) He himself, however, was the master of both, and his beautiful art is a prfect confirmation to this.
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Reading Like a Scientist

This morning, I came across an excellent article by K.M. Weiland 7 Steps to Creating a Flexible Outline for Any Story . While I was studying it, I kept catching myself on switching to my “scientist reading mode”, which has developed through years of my academic career and seems so natural to me that I read nearly everything – even fiction – this way now. I must mention to K.M.Weiland’s favor that her writing is always very logical, well-structured and brilliantly worded.

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“In questions of science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual.”― Galileo Galilei

Having spent decades of my life doing academic research, supervising post-graduate students and writing university coursebooks, I always tend to look for structure in every piece of text that comes into the range of my vision. First of all, I mark out the keywords  in the title, then my eyes stubbornly try to find these keywodrds throughout the whole text. I admire well-structured texts, and always, no matter what I am reading, I make lots of notes while reading.

The article about creating an outline of a story seemed not only well-structured, but also very informative to me as a beginner in fiction writing (a rare pleasure to come across in the world of creative bloggers and fiction writers), so I could not help but making lots of notes as I read it through. This is what I got in the end, and these colored notes – no doubt – will now help me a lot to learn K.Weilland’s method in detail. I have pasted the article with the notes below, to demonstrate how its brilliant structure becomes a roadmap for every working author to use when creating outlines of their stories. If you only pick out the colored notes, you will get the full skeleton of K.M.Weiland’s methodology. If you pick out both, the colored notes and the underlined phrases throughout the text, you will get a great set of tips to keep in mind when writing your own story outline. Enjoy!

Once again, many thanks to the author for her elaborate work and very useful advice!

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“Everything must be taken into account. If the fact will not fit the theory—let the theory go.” 
― Agatha Christie

7 Steps to Creating a Flexible Outline for Any Story, by K.M.Weiland

(Keywords: outline / story outline (story outlines are the object of research) ; creating / steps to creating)

(Science name for the article would be: Creating a Story Outline)

“Mention the word outline in a room full of writers, and you’re sure to ignite a firestorm of passionate debate. Writers either love outlines, or they hate them. We either find them liberating, or we can’t stand how confining they are. (Problem identified)

My experience has been that more often than not, those who swear they dislike outlines are thinking of them in the wrong ways. (Common practice that brings up the problem)

Outlines are not meant to trap you into preset ideas or sap your creativity before you start the first draft. Outlines are also definitely not meant to be lifeless Roman-numeral lists. (main qualities of outlines discussed)

To imbue your writing with the full power of outlining, (the task of the research is set) you need to approach the process from a mindset of flexibility and discovery.(method outlined) When you do this, you’ll end up with a road map to storytelling success. (anticipated result identified)

Road maps are there to show you the fastest and surest way to reach your destination, but they certainly don’t prevent you from finding exciting off-road adventures and scenic drives along the way. (relevance explained)

At their best, outlines can help you (a) flesh out your most promising story ideas, (b) avoid dead-end plot twists and (c) pursue proper structure. And the greatest part? They (d) save you time and (e) prevent frustration. (the object of research and its main characteristics outlined)

Sketching out your plot and characters in your first draft can take months of trial and error. Figuring out those same elements in an outline requires a fraction of the time—and then allows you to let loose and have fun in your first draft. (difference between drafting a plot and writing an outline is shown)

Let’s take a look at how to get the most out of the outlining process, beginning with the shaping of your premise and working all the way through to a complete list of scenes. (the goal of the article is set) (Note: Although this outlining method is one I use myself and highly recommend, keep in mind that there is no right or wrong way to outline a story. The only requirement is that you find the groove that works for you. If you start outlining and begin to feel the technique isn’t working for you, rather than denouncing outlines entirely, consider how you might adjust the process to better suit your personality and creative style.) (special conditions outlined)

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“If you’ve got the truth you can demonstrate it. Talking doesn’t prove it.” 
― Robert A. Heinlein

(The steps of research are outlined below)

1. Craft your premise. (write a one paragraph summary of the work)

Your premise is the basic idea for your story. But it’s not enough to just have an idea. “Guy saves girl in an intergalactic setting” is a premise, but it’s also far too vague to offer much solid story guidance.

This is why your outline needs to begin with a tightly crafted premise sentence that can answer the following questions:

• Who is the protagonist? (identify protagonist)

• What is the situation? What is the hero’s personal condition at the beginning? How will that condition be changed, for better or worse, by the hero himself or by the antagonistic force? (outline situation)

• What is the protagonist’s objective? At the beginning, what does the hero want? What moral (or immoral) choices will she have to make in her attempt to gain that objective? (set the objective).

• Who is the opponent? Who or what stands in the way of the hero achieving his objective? (describe antagonist)

• What will be the disaster? What misfortune will befall the hero as the result of her attempts to achieve her objective? (outline the problem and goal)

• What’s the conflict? What conflict will result from the hero’s reaction to the disaster? And what is the logical flow of cause and effect that will allow this conflict to continue throughout the story? (conflict/contradiction)

Once you’ve answered these questions, combine them into one or two sentences: (another step of research suggested)

Restless farm boy (situation) Luke Skywalker (protagonist) wants nothing more than to leave home and become a starfighter pilot, so he can live up to his mysterious father (objective). But when his aunt and uncle are murdered (disaster) after purchasing renegade droids, Luke must free the droids’ beautiful owner and discover a way to stop (conflict) the evil Empire (opponent) and its apocalyptic Death Star.

2. Roughly sketch scene ideas. (drafting the big picture)

Armed with a solid premise, you can now begin sketching your ideas for this story. Write a list of everything you already know about your story. You’ll probably come to this step with a handful of scenes already in mind. Even if you have no idea how these scenes will play out in the story, go ahead and add them to the list. At this point, your primary goal is to remember and record every idea you’ve had in relation to this story.

Once you’ve finished, take a moment to review your list. Whenever you encounter an idea that raises questions, highlight it. If you don’t know why your character is fighting a duel in one scene, highlight it. If you don’t know how two scenes will connect, highlight them. If you can’t picture the setting for one of the scenes, highlight that, too. By pausing to identify possible plot holes now, you’ll be able to save yourself a ton of rewriting later on.

Your next step is to address each of the highlighted portions, one by one. Write out your ideas and let your thoughts flow without censoring yourself. Because this is the most unstructured step of your outline, this will be your best opportunity to unleash your creativity and plumb the depths of your story’s potential. Ask yourself questions on the page. Talk to yourself without worrying about punctuation or spelling.

Every time you think you’ve come up with a good idea, take a moment to ask yourself, “Will the reader expect this?” If the answer is yes, write a list of alternatives your readers won’t expect. (a sequence of steps suggested in order to achieve the goal)

3. Interview your characters. (take only the main characters now)

In order to craft a cast of characters that can help your plot reach its utmost potential, you’ll need to discover crucial details about them, not necessarily at the beginning of their lives but at the beginning of the story. (do interview the characters!)

To do this for your protagonist, work backward from the moment in which he will become engaged in your plot (the “disaster” in your premise sentence). What events in your protagonist’s life have led him to this moment? Did something in his past cause the disaster? What events have shaped him to make him respond to the disaster in the way he does? What unresolved issues from his past can further complicate the plot’s spiral of events? (work backward method – try it!)

(useful tips here)

Once you have a basic idea of how your character will be invested in the main story, you can start unearthing the nitty-gritty details of his life with a character interview. You may choose to follow a preset list of questions (you can find a list of more than 100 such questions in my book Outlining Your Novel: Map Your Way to Success), or you may have better luck with a “freehand interview” in which you ask your protagonist a series of questions and allow him to answer in his own words. (try to do both and see what works better)

4. Explore your settings. (list the main settings)

Whether your setting is your childhood neighborhood or the seventh moon of Barsoom, you’ll want to enter your first draft with a firm idea of where your prominent scenes will be taking place. (think over locations of scenes)

Don’t choose a setting just because it sounds cool or because you’re familiar with it. Look for settings that will be inherent to your plot. Can you change your story’s primary locale without any significant alterations to the plot? If so, dig a little deeper to find a setting better suited to your plot, theme and characters.

Based on the scenes you’re already aware of, list the settings you think you’ll need. Can you reduce this list by combining or eliminating settings? Nothing wrong with a sprawling story locale, but extraneous settings should be eliminated just as assiduously as unnecessary characters.
5. Write your complete outline. (write an extended outline)

You’re finally ready to outline your story in full. This is where you will begin plotting in earnest. In Step 2, you solidified the big picture of your story by identifying the scenes you were already aware of and figuring out how they might fit together. Now, you will work through your story linearly, scene by scene, numbering each one as you go. Unlike the “sketches” in Step 2, in which your primary focus was on brainstorming and exploring possibilities, you will now be concentrating on molding your existing ideas into a solid structure. (outlining the first rough draft)

How comprehensive you want to be is up to you. You may choose to write a single sentence for each scene (“Dana meets Joe at the café to discuss their impending nuptials”), or you may choose to flesh out more details (“Joe is sitting by himself in a booth when Dana arrives; Dana orders coffee and a muffin; they fight about the invitation list”). (sub-methods listed)

Either way, focus on identifying and strengthening the key components of each scene’s structure. Who will be your narrating character? What is his goal? What obstacle will arise to obstruct that goal and create conflict? What will be the outcome, and how will your character react to the resulting dilemma? What decision will he reach that will fuel the next scene’s goal? (outline the key components of scenes in connection with the goal)

Work to create a linear, well-structured plot with no gaps in the story (see the checklist on the opposite page). If you can get this foundation right in your outline, you’ll later be free to apply all your focus and imagination to the first draft and bring your story to life.

As you mentally work through each scene, watch for possible lapses of logic or blank areas in how one event builds to another. Take the time to think through these potential problems so they won’t trip you up later. If you get stuck, try jumping ahead to the next scene (good sub-method) you know, and then working backward. For instance, if you know where you want your characters to end up, but not how they’ll get there, start at the ending point and then see if you can figure out what has to happen in the preceding events to make it plausible.

6. Condense your outline. (write an abbreviated version)

Once you’ve finished your extended outline, you may want to condense the most pertinent points into an abbreviated version. Doing so allows you to weed out extraneous thoughts and summarize the entire outline into a scannable list for easier reference. Because your full outline may contain a fair amount of rambling and thinking out loud on the page, you’re likely to end up with a lot of notes to review (I often have nearly three notebooks of material). Rather than having to wade through the bulk of your notes every time you sit down to work on your first draft, you can save yourself time in the long run by doing a little organizing now.

You may choose to create your abbreviated outline in a Word document, write out your scenes on index cards, or use a software program such as the free Scrivener alternative yWriter.

7. Put your outline into action. (useful tips here)

By now, you’ll be feeling prepared and eager to get going on your first draft. Each time you sit down to work on your manuscript, begin by reviewing your outline. Read the notes for your current scene and the scene to follow. Before you start writing, work through any remaining potential problems in your head or on paper. If the time comes (and it will come) when you’re struck with a better idea than what you had planned in your outline, don’t hesitate to go off-road. These ventures into unknown territory can result in some of the most surprising and intriguing parts of your story.

An outline will offer you invaluable structure and guidance as you write your first draft, but never be afraid to explore new ideas as they occur. Remember, your outline is a map showing you the route to your destination, but that doesn’t mean it is the only route. (outline is a kind of a road map for the story)

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“Science, my boy, is made up of mistakes, but they are mistakes which it is useful to make, because they lead little by little to the truth.” 
― Jules Verne

The Best Passages From The Great Gatsby

Just another reminder of the wonderful book which I have read many times and am going to read again soon.

101 Books

If Fitzgerald’s prose is like butter, then The Great Gatsby is like bathing in a giant vat of delicious, theater popcorn.

I’ve read this novel multiple times, and I’m always struck by how I never grow tired of reading it. Every single passage lives and breathes and just jumps of the page. Fitzgerald wrote with such a purpose.

With my review coming on Monday, I thought I’d share some of my favorite passages and quotes from The Great Gatsby today.

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Nabokov’s Lolita

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“If a violin string could ache, I would be that string.” These words, better than any others, reflect the emotional content of Nabokov’s book. To me, Lolita is the pinnacle of Nabokov’s writing. The book is a masterpiece, perfect as it is: an incredible, yet harmonious blend of aesthetically beautiful narrative and a full palette of human emotions.

I remember reading the book in Russian when I was a teenager, it left me bewildered then: I could sense the beauty of the language, but I was not ready to grasp the depths of human misery, because understanding comes with experience, and I was too young for the book. Today, when I am a whole life older, Lolita is one of my personal aesthetical treasures, and I think it will remain one till the end of my life.

Very few authors have the courage to portray love in such a variety of colors. Very few can sympathize with their character so deeply that even ugliness appears beautiful in their hands. Nabokov did this job perfectly well.

Nabokov himself used to say: “Read the books that you love with a thrill and a gasp of delight” (“Книги, которые вы любите, нужно читать, вздрагивая и задыхаясь от восторга.”) I can say that this time, re-reading Nabokov’s Lolita, I experienced exactly the same feelings.

Kurt Vonnegut’s Letter to the Future Must Be Taken Seriously Today.

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In 1988, Kurt Vonnegut wrote his famous Letter to the Future and addressed it to Ladies & Gentlemen of A.D. 2088. In it, Vonnegut expressed hope that people of the future would stop “choosing abysmally ignorant optimists for positions of leadership.” But alas! Nearly thirty years after the letter was written, people seem to be exactly the same, yet the situation with climate, pollution, uncontrolled population growth, mass ignorance and aggression has worsened dramatically. It is really time to take action in response to K.Vonnegut’s Letter, because, as funny as it sounds, the future has arrived sooner than anybody could anticipate.

K.Vonnegut’s words sound especially notable today, less than a week before the USA elections – the event which is going to influence the lives of all population of the world.

Kurt Vonnegut suggested a few simple steps to take, but these steps could literally save the world today. The sad thing is that time seems to have accelerated for us: the future has arrived, and if we decide to wait till 2088, there may be no Ladies and Gentlemen to read Vonnegut’s letter than.

Here are a few lines from K.Vonnegut’s letter to the Future:

“The sort of leaders we need now are not those who promise ultimate victory over Nature through perseverance in living as we do right now, but those with the courage and intelligence to present to the world what appears to be Nature’s stern but reasonable surrender terms:

1. Reduce and stabilize your population.

2. Stop poisoning the air, the water, and the topsoil.

3. Stop preparing for war and start dealing with your real problems.

4. Teach your kids, and yourselves, too, while you’re at it, how to inhabit a small planet without helping to kill it.

5. Stop thinking science can fix anything if you give it a trillion dollars.

6. Stop thinking your grandchildren will be OK no matter how wasteful or destructive you may be, since they can go to a nice new planet on a spaceship. That is really mean, and stupid…

7. And so on. Or else.”

Shelf Love

live mines and duds: the reading life

May The Best Book Win!

here nests a librocubicularist who prefers nonfiction and moonlights as the host of Silent Book Club Kota Kinabalu. writes on Scrivener for pleasure.